Tag Archives: oceanography

Event: Info Sessions for Fall at Friday Harbor Labs (Autumn Application Deadline: 04/15/16)

Fall in Friday Harbor Info Sessions

Spend fall quarter studying at the UW’s marine field station in the San Juan Islands. Get started by attending one of our info sessions this quarter.

INFO SESSION I: Marine Biology and the Humanities
When: Tuesday 4/12, 3:30 – 4:30 pm
Where: Thompson Hall, Rm 234
RSVP: https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/marbiol/299813

Start here if you want to learn more about courses in the humanities and introductory courses in marine biology for students of any major. Hear about the courses and living experience from faculty and students including creative writing professor and award-winning poet Richard Kenney, FHL Associate Director Megan Dethier, and FHL alumnus and English major Zack Bivins (winner of this year’s Oceans 180 competition).

INFO SESSION II: Marine Biology and Research
When: Tuesday 4/26, 3:30 – 4:30 pm
Where: Ocean Sciences Building, Rm 425
RSVP: https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/marbiol/299825
RSVP: https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/marbiol/299825

Start here if you are interested in research relevant to science majors. Learn about 15 credit ‘research apprenticeships’ in marine sediment and the pelagic ecosystem (PEF) from Oceanography Professor Andrea Ogston and PEF staff Rachel Wold.

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AUT 2016 Courses at Friday Harbor

Spend Fall Quarter 2016 in Friday Harbor!

Join English professor and award-winning poet Richard Kenney and a band of writers, artists, scientists and naturalists in the San Juan Islands for an intensive, inspiring course in literature, creative writing, and marine biology.  No experience is required — just bring your curiosity and imagination.

This fall, live by the sea and enroll in courses that explore the beautiful and varied marine environment at the University of Washington’s Friday Harbor campus.  Read, write, and explore the sea and the seashore through literature, creative writing, marine biology, ocean, and fisheries courses (12-17 credits) that take full advantage of the San Juan Island setting. What better place to read works of sea-faring literature, or to take a marine biology course where you can actually interact with the marine life you are studying? Writers, artists, scientists, and researchers have long been drawn to the sea — come and experience it for yourself while earning UW credit.

Costs include room, board (three delicious meals per day), and course/lab fees.  Just bring your ferry fare and pocket money.

More information (and application) at http://depts.washington.edu/engl/cw/poetryfh16.php

Like Friday Harbor Creative Writing on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/FridayHarborCreativeWriting/

Course/Research Opportunity: Study at Friday Harbor Labs (SPR/SUM Application Deadline: 02/01/16)

Study at Friday Harbor Labs this Year
Spend a quarter studying in residence at the UW’s marine field station at Friday Harbor Labs (FHL). Undergraduates can study at FHL in spring, summer or autumn quarters, and the deadline for spring/summer applications is February 1.

● Explore the marine environment of the Salish Sea where your classroom is a marine preserve, and the boats are just steps away from your dorm.
● Courses for all levels from introductory marine biology to advanced research apprenticeships.
● Get to know your teachers with class sizes frequently less than 20 students.

Info Session
Thursday, January 21, 10:30-11:20 am, Fishery Sciences Building (FSH) 203 [map]
RSVP

Get all the information you need to know to plan for a quarter or course at Friday Harbor Labs. Meet faculty, TAs, and students from past quarters, and learn about the courses offered this year.

Courses
(Spring) Marine Biology Quarter: Students starting their exploration of the marine environment (few or no pre-reqs) build a schedule around courses in introductory marine biology, science writing, statistics, or oceanography. Spring 2016 course list

(Spring) Marine Zoology/Botany (Zoo-Bot) Quarter: A fixed schedule of three integrated courses (for undergrads with biological sciences background), including an individual research project mentored by FHL faculty and instructors.

(Summer): A selection of intensive, half-term (5 week) courses including Marine Invertebrate Zoology or Ecology & Conservation of Marine Birds & Mammals. Summer 2016 course list

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Job Opportunity: Environmental Educator and Deckhand – Children’s Maritime Foundation

Children's Maritime Foundation LogoEnvironmental Educator and Deckhand
Children’s Maritime Foundation
Location: Long Beach, California

Environmental Educator & Deckhand
Children’s Maritime Foundation, aboard the American Pride
Long Beach, CA

Full time, year round

Position starts: January 20- February 15th
Compensation: room, board, and monthly salary dependent on knowledge, skills and experience
Contact: Rachel Young

Ideal Qualifications:
Degree in Marine Biology, Environmental Education or related field
Experience or desire to work in outdoor education setting
Experience or desire to lead adventure based trips
First Aid/CPR
Lifeguard Certification

The American Pride is a historic 130’ three masted schooner, she was built in 1941 and is currently located in Long Beach, CA. Owned and operated by the Children’s Maritime Foundation, a nonprofit foundation whose mission is to enrich the minds and transform the lives of California youth through immersion in a maritime learning environment. We provide shipboard learning experiences that cannot be replicated in the classroom, while offering hands on, action oriented activities that stress leadership, teamwork, communication and good sportsmanship. We strive to promote interest and education in the value and worthiness of our national maritime heritage and historic sailing ships, as well as education, awareness and preservation of the earth’s oceans and welfare of all marine life.

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WIN 2016 Course: Water Is Life – Water, Health, and Ecosystem Services among American Indians and Alaskan Natives (AIS 375 A)

Water Is Life: Water, Health, and Ecosystem Services among American Indians and Alaskan Natives
AIS 375 A, SLN 21716
I&S, NW available for students who contact AIS adviser Elissa Washuta (elissaw@uw.edu)
5 credits
Tu/Th 3:30 – 5:20 pm
Instructor: Clarita Lefthand-Begay

At the completion of this class, you will understand the connections between tribal water security, culture and health among Indigenous communities in the United States. The class will also discuss the importance of self-determination for tribal and indigenous communities that are struggling to meet their community’s water security needs. Other topics will include water policies, water scarcity, hauling practices, fish consumption rates, ocean acidification, dam removal and Gold King Mine spill, which you will learn about via class and guest lectures, readings, short essay writings, group discussions, and by delivering short PowerPoint presentations. You will also participate in a community project to support tribal water security efforts in the United States. This class will have a course fee ($30).

Job Opportunity: Environmental Educator – Children’s Maritime Foundation

Children's Maritime Foundation LogoEnvironmental Educator & Deckhand
Children’s Maritime Foundation, aboard the American Pride
Location:
Long Beach, California
Website: http://www.AmericanPride.org

Full time, year round
Position starts: January 20-30
Compensation: room, board, and monthly salary dependent on knowledge, skills and experience

Ideal Qualifications:
Degree in Marine Biology, Environmental Education or related field
Experience or desire to work in outdoor education setting
Experience or desire to lead adventure based trips
First Aid/CPR
Lifeguard Certification

The American Pride is a historic 130’ three masted schooner, she was built in 1941 and is currently located in Long Beach, CA. Owned and operated by the Children’s Maritime Foundation, a nonprofit foundation whose mission is to enrich the minds and transform the lives of California youth through immersion in a maritime learning environment. We provide shipboard learning experiences that cannot be replicated in the classroom, while offering hands on, action oriented activities that stress leadership, teamwork, communication and good sportsmanship. We strive to promote interest and education in the value and worthiness of our national maritime heritage and historic sailing ships, as well as education, awareness and preservation of the earth’s oceans and welfare of all marine life.

The position includes many aspects that vary depending on the season and current programming but will definitely include: Living, playing and working aboard a tallship, kayaking, snorkeling, hiking, swimming, playing games, hanging out on the beach, occasionally dressing up as a sailor, and ship maintenance. As part of our programming, which may last between three hours and five days, you may teach about fish and squid anatomy, touch tank critters, tide pools, knots, maritime history, sharks, water quality, ship construction, oceanography, stars, geology, island flora and fauna, and kelp forests just to name a few. We do not expect our applicants to have all these skills just the desire to build upon their knowledge and experience.

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WIN 2016 Course: Water Is Life – Water, Health, and Ecosystem Services among American Indians and Alaskan Natives (AIS 275)

Water Is Life: Water, Health, and Ecosystem Services among American Indians and Alaskan Natives
AIS 275 A, SLN 21460
I&S, NW available for students who contact AIS adviser Elissa Washuta (elissaw@uw.edu)
5 credits
Tu/Th 3:30 – 5:20 pm
Instructor: Clarita Lefthand-Begay

At the completion of this class, you will understand the connections between tribal water security, culture and health among Indigenous communities in the United States. The class will also discuss the importance of self-determination for tribal and indigenous communities that are struggling to meet their community’s water security needs. Other topics will include water policies, water scarcity, hauling practices, fish consumption rates, ocean acidification, dam removal and Gold King Mine spill, which you will learn about via class and guest lectures, readings, short essay writings, group discussions, and by delivering short PowerPoint presentations. You will also participate in a community project to support tribal water security efforts in the United States. This class will have a course fee (TBD).