Tag Archives: lectures

Outdoor Education Lecture and Course

The College of Education is hosting faculty from our partner institution in Norway for a lecture on May 4th at 4:30PM. At this event, students will engage in meaningful discussion about the impact of outdoor education on children and youth.

Additionally, the College of Education will be offering a 499 course on this topic during Winter and Spring, 2018. The course will be open to undergraduate and graduate students. NW credit awarded for both courses. Priority course registration will be given to students who attend the May 4th event.

More details in the attached flyer. RSVP required.

Outdoor Education Event & Course

Advertisements

Lecture Series: Spring 2017 Genomics Salon

See below for a schedule of Spring Quarter Genomics Salon activities.

Thursday April 6, 2017, 4:30pm (Foege S-110)
Salon XVI: Science communication in the age of social media
April Lo (Genome Sciences) and Orlando de Lange (Electrical Engineering)
Twitter, facebook, youtube and reddit – more ways than ever to communicate your science, and also more ways to get trolled, ignored and echo-chambered. How successfully are scientists navigating these new and potentially treacherous waters?

Thursday April 13, 2017, 4:30pm (Foege auditorium)
Salon XVII: Science communication: Life on the front lines 
Jen McCreight (Genome Sciences), Michelle Ma (UW Today), Sabrina Richards (FHCRC)

*Note that this session will be held in Foege auditorium.* This special session of the Genomics Salon invites speakers to address how science is and should be communicated to the public, with an emphasis on written media, and asks how scientists can get involved. Jennifer McCreight, a recent Genome Sciences graduate, has blogged as The Blag Hag and at The Jenome. Michelle Ma is the assistant director of UW Office of News and Information. Sabrina Richards is a science news writer at the Fred Hutch.

Wednesday April 19, 2017, 4:30pm (Foege N-130)
Salon XVIII: Translating infectious-disease research into public policy
Marc Lipsitch (Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health)

*Note that this session will be held in Foege N-130.* Influenza can cause global pandemics when strains from birds or pigs make the jump into humans. Although many scientists are working predict which strains might cause future pandemics, gaps in our knowledge of influenza biology substantially limit our predictive abilities. This session will explore the extent that we can rely on these predictions to guide public-health policy. What level of certainty, and about what, do decision makers need to enact costly preventative measures such as poultry culling or vaccine stockpiling? Some experiments on non-human influenza that aim to refine these predictions can also pose a threat to public health (e.g., if these strains are accidentally released from the lab). We will also discuss ethical considerations behind this kind of dual-use research on infectious diseases.

Thursday April 27, 2017, 4:30pm (Foege S-110)
Salon XIX: Science advocacy
Cecilia Noecker (Genome Sciences) and Elyse Hope (Genome Sciences)
Scientists are in the news and taking to the streets. Should we lean into this politicization or resist it? Should we advocate for scientific results or the scientific process? And where does science communication end and advocacy begin?

Wednesday May 3, 2017, 5:30pm (Foege auditorium)
Salon XX: Movie night: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

*Note that this session will be held in Foege auditorium, on a Wednesday, at 5:30pm.* Join us for a screening of the new HBO movie, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. This movie explores the true story of Henrietta Lacks, a woman whose cancer cells were used by researchers, without her consent, to conduct life-saving research.

Thursday evenings May 4, 11, 18, and Saturday afternoon June 10
Workshops: Science communication streams
Bryce Taylor (TALK), Katherine Xue (WRITE), and Orlando de Lange (CONNECT)
This month-long workshop series will explore three modes of science communication: TALKWRITE, and CONNECT. In the TALK stream, participants will workshop presentations for a variety of informal settings. In the WRITE stream, participants will produce a piece of writing that creatively and critically approaches scientific concepts. In the CONNECT stream, participants will explore how new technologies and innovations are democratizing the process of science. The workshops will culminate in a half-day session on Saturday, June 10, which will also feature a special plenary session on science activism (Hannah Gelman, GS). Check out the full syllabus for each workshop here, and sign up here by April 4 to have the best chance of securing a spot.

Lecture Series: Genomics Salon

Happy new year! We’re excited to bring you another set of Genomics Salon discussions for winter quarter. The first one will be this Thursday, January 5, at 4:30pm in Foege S-110, on the topic “Whose genomes matter? Genomics-research diversity in context.” Take a look at our upcoming schedule of events below, check out our website and twitter, and like our Facebook page. As always, snacks and drinks will be provided, and all faculty, students, and staff are welcome. See you there!
 
Thursday January 5, 2017, 4:30pm (Foege S-110)
Salon XI: Whose genomes matter? Genomics-research diversity in context
Alice Popejoy (Public Health Genetics) and Joanne Woiak (Disability Studies)
Even as genomics technologies become more powerful, their focus remains heavily on individuals of European descent – a disparity with deep historical and cultural roots.  This session will discuss scientific and philosophical issues that relate to the under-representation of minority populations in genomics research, with a particular focus on recruitment and population genetics in the context of historical and modern-day eugenics. What concepts of genetics, race, and identity contributed to the development of past eugenic ideologies? How do the shadow of eugenics and the historic underrepresentation of certain populations continue to affect the practice of genetics and biomedicine today?
 
Thursday January 19, 2017, 4:30pm (Foege N-130)
Salon XII: The next four years: science and environmental policy under the Trump administration
 
*Note that this session will be held in Foege N-130.* The inauguration of Donald Trump promises changes in US science and environmental policy. This special session of the Genomics Salon invites speakers to address how science and environmental policy priorities are set at the local and national level, and to ask how scientists can participate in policy-making and advocacy. Scott Spencer, a graduate student at the Evans School, studies science policy; Sarah Myhre, a postdoc in oceanology, writes about the role of climate scientists in reaching out to the public; Susanna Priest, editor of Science Communication, has recently finished a book on communicating climate change.
 
Thursday February 2, 2017, 4:30pm (Foege S-110)
Salon XIII: Science and responsibility
Hannah Gelman (Genome Sciences) and Doug Fowler (Genome Sciences)
The pace of scientific and technological progress can be bewildering. Recent developments in diverse fields such as genetic engineering, artificial intelligence, and renewable energy highlight the possibility of conflict between scientific research and public opinion. In this session, we will discuss the role of scientists in advancing and/or regulating scientific research and innovation, especially when this research may “run ahead” of public understanding or comfort. What factors should influence the development of a field, and who should be involved in evaluating them? Furthermore, in a rapidly evolving field, is it possible to effectively evaluate, let alone regulate, future applications?
 
Thursday February 16, 2017, 4:30pm (Foege S-110)
Salon XIV: CSI Genomics
Sarah Hilton (Genome Sciences) and Murial Moore (The Innocence Project Northwest Clinic at UW Law)
Genomic technologies have become powerful tools in criminal court, with DNA sequencing routinely used to identify or exonerate suspects, but the role of scientific evidence in court is not always straightforward. This session will explore how science and law intersect in the form of forensic genetic technologies. What is the role of scientists as expert witnesses, and how is scientific uncertainty interpreted in a legal context? How does the nature of evidence change when genetic methods move from a research to legal context?
 
Wednesday March 1, 2017, 4:30pm (Foege S-110)
Salon XV: Genomics, representation, and equity
Aaron Wolf (Genome Sciences) and James Pfeiffer (Global Health)
 
*Note that this session will be held on a Wednesday.* Recent large-scale initiatives in genome sequencing have aimed to expand genomic analysis to diverse global populations. With more data, the thinking goes, the genomic medicine can cover and benefit historically underrepresented groups. This session will examine issues of representation and equity in genomic medicine. Who benefits from the “mining” of genomic data? Does this turn in genomic medicine mark a new age in global health, or a new wave of colonialism?

Talk: “The Convergence of Teacher Shortages and Teacher Turnover with Federal Education Policy: What Does It Mean for Teacher Preparation?” (11/03/16)

Jane WestJane West, the former Policy Director at the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education and currently a Visiting Professor of Education at the University of Maryland and an independent policy consultant, will give a talk on Thursday November 3rd 1130am-1pm in 411 Miller Hall. Please see the attached flier with more information about Dr. West and her talk.

Jane West Boeing Talk Flyer 11-3-16

Lecture: “School and District Improvement in WA: Future Support and Current Reality” (05/31/16)

University of Washington College of Education LogoThe state Assistant Superintendent, Michael Merrin, will visit us on campus and give a talk on May 31. The title of his talk is:
“School and District Improvement in WA: Future Support and Current Reality”.

The talk will focus on improving the lowest performing schools and districts in the context of the implementation of Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

All Are Welcome!

Tuesday May 31, 2016
10:00-11:30am
Miller 112

Michael Merrin Flier

Lecture: The Dynamics of Students’ Engagement and Persistence in Science (05/03/16)

David HammerDavid Hammer will be visiting UW on Tuesday, May 3, and giving a talk.  The talk is from 2:003:30 in the Physics-Astronomy Building, Room C520.

The Dynamics of Students’ Engagement and Persistence in Science[1]
David Hammer, Tufts University

For the past two years our group[2] has been been considering episodes of students’ inquiry from our data in elementary schools and university settings. Working with collaborating faculty from chemistry, physics, and biology, we select examples everyone agrees clearly show students’ doing science. We then subject these to close analysis, moment-by-moment, to understand insofar as the data allows what aspects of the situation contributed to the dynamics. With nine such analyses in hand, we look for themes or categories. Some of what this accomplishes is to articulate tacit criteria in what we think of as science.

I will review several interacting dimensions of what we have seen across cases: one or more students’ positioning themselves as not understanding; the role of affect and in particular what we have started to describe as “vexation;” and students’ efforts and agency in articulating a problem. And I’ll focus on one interesting, non-tautological result: In five of the nine cases, the dynamics involved students working to formulate and convince each other of a question.

Continue reading