Tag Archives: environment

Job Opportunity: Environmental Education Instructor – Mount Rainier Institute (Application Deadline: 07/07/17)

EE Instructor
Deadline to Apply: Friday, July 7, 2017, 4:30pm
Organization: Mount Rainier Institute-University of Washington

Job Description:
Environmental Education Instructors are key members of the program staff. They lead youth and adults through field science investigations, and teach a variety of topics such as bio-diversity, natural history, forestry, resource management, and cultural history of the Pacific Northwest. EE Instructors have the opportunity for professional growth through the development of their naturalist, outdoor education, and resource interpretation skills and techniques. This is an excellent opportunity to be part of ongoing development of a relatively new residential environmental education program.

Term of Position: Fall 2017 season is late August through mid-November, may involve weekend and evening hours. Shared housing will be provided for a modest monthly rental fee.

Mount Rainier Institute is committed to diversity. We welcome qualified applicants regardless of race, religion, color, sexual orientation, or gender.

RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Lead students through Mount Rainier Institute programs in natural and cultural history, inquiry-based field investigations, and resource stewardship for youth and adults; primarily students in grades 3-12.
  • Lead half-day and day-long educational hikes (including using snowshoes) on Pack Forest and Mount Rainier National Park trails.
  • Assist in the design of customized environmental and science education programs for students of all ages.
  • Attend training and regularly scheduled staff meetings.
  • Ensure safety and well-being of program participants.
  • Conduct evening and weekend programs as needed.
  • Assist in the maintenance of all program supplies, equipment, and facilities.
  • Assist with other duties as required.

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Outdoor Education Lecture and Course

The College of Education is hosting faculty from our partner institution in Norway for a lecture on May 4th at 4:30PM. At this event, students will engage in meaningful discussion about the impact of outdoor education on children and youth.

Additionally, the College of Education will be offering a 499 course on this topic during Winter and Spring, 2018. The course will be open to undergraduate and graduate students. NW credit awarded for both courses. Priority course registration will be given to students who attend the May 4th event.

More details in the attached flyer. RSVP required.

Outdoor Education Event & Course

Job Opportunity: Part-Time Urban Programs Educator – Islandwood

IslandWood LogoOverview: Urban Programs Educators teach outdoor field studies for the IslandWood Urban Programs team based both at the Brightwater Education Center in Woodinville and in the Seattle area at schools and other public spaces. Educator work schedules vary and can be adapted to fit a changing class and/or work schedule.

Brightwater programs take place at the Brightwater Education Center in Woodinville. The Center is located on King County property and includes a wastewater treatment plant, 70 acres of natural area, and a state-of-the-art learning center, laboratory and exhibit hall. Brightwater programs are designed for 3rd-8th graders and utilize the features of the Brightwater Center including the ponds, streams, well-equipped laboratories, and the wastewater treatment plant itself. The school day programs include three offerings: Landforms Field Study (focusing on environmental engineering and stormwater), Freshwater Ecosystems Field Study (a study of our ponds through an ecosystem services lens), and Humans and the Water Cycle (a close look at how people fit into the water cycle – specifically, the waste water treatment cycle).

IslandWood’s Land and Water Field Study program focuses on investigating urban stream ecosystems and their role in the community at Seattle creeks.

Urban Programs Educators may also be responsible for the delivery of programs directly related to IslandWood’s School Overnight Program including parent and student orientations and pre and post-visit lessons at partner schools. These programs may include evening hours.

Additional work opportunities may be available to educators, including community events, curriculum planning, and other IslandWood programming. Days and times for these opportunities vary.

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Job/Internship Opportunities: Education/Interpretation – Mount St. Helens Institute

Mount St Helens Institute LogoThe Mount St. Helens Institute is excited to announce 4 seasonal positions at Mount St. Helens. While its not necessarily collecting data or studying volcanoes; it is sharing appreciation and understanding of volcanoes with youth and adults.
This includes working with the USGS/MSHI collaborative GeoGirls progra and working at Johnston Ridge Observatory.
Position Description HERE and attached.
Please share with your current and former students:
  • Science Education – 2 positions available – starts April 17; closes March 6
  • Education and Interpretation Internship
  • Interpretation Internship

Mount St. Helens Educator

Mt. St. Helens Education and Interpretation Intern

Mt. S. Helens Interpretation Intern

Job Opportunity: Community Programs Manager – Audubon Society of Portland (Application Deadline: 02/27/17)

Audubon Society of Portland LogoJOB ANNOUNCEMENT
Job Title: Community Programs Manager
Department: Education Department
Reports to: Education Director
Classification: Full-time, Exempt
Compensation: $43,000 to 48,000 plus health and retirement benefits

About Audubon Society of Portland
Audubon Society of Portland has been a leading voice in conservation for over a century.
Through conservation advocacy, environmental education, our wildlife rehabilitation center, and other programs we promote the understanding, enjoyment, and protection of native birds, other wildlife and their habitat. We are located in a 150-acre wildlife sanctuary in Forest Park, just minutes from downtown Portland. With over 15,000 members and 450 regular volunteers, we are the largest independent chapter of the National Audubon Society in the United States. Additional background regarding our extensive education, advocacy, wildlife rehabilitation and habitat programs can be found at www.audubonportland.org.

Job Summary
The Community Programs Manager will help lead and manage community-based youth
programs, including the Community Camps and TALON leadership program. The Community
Programs Manager is an integral member of Portland Audubon’s collaborative team of adult and youth educators, directly leading innovative programs as well as providing input regarding the inclusiveness and cultural awareness of Portland Audubon programs.

Our Community Camps provide hands-on, nature-based education through summer camps at
little or no cost to participants. In partnership with community development organizations like
Hacienda, Bienestar and ROSE CDC, these programs are offered at a variety of Portland
metropolitan area neighborhood and family events.

The TALON program provides extensive training and employment for young adults aged 16-20
as they learn skills that will help them succeed in conservation and environmental education
professions. TALON teens participate in a 10-week training program that provides a foundation
in local natural history, environmental science, and local and regional conservation issues. Each
participant is then placed in a summer apprenticeship position in Portland Audubon’s education, conservation, wildlife rehabilitation or nature sanctuary programs, with the opportunity for a second consecutive year of involvement.

Qualified applicants have proven experience working with underserved communities and
communities of color, and experience teaching in an informal outdoor setting. The position will
participate in ongoing efforts to create a more inclusive culture throughout Portland Audubon,
both internally and through our outward-facing programs.

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Paid Internship Opportunity: Environmental Equity Intern – Seattle City Light (Application Deadline: 02/21/17)

Position Description Benefits Supplemental Questions
Seattle City Light, a department of the City of Seattle, is one of the nation’s largest municipally owned utilities in terms of the number of customers served. Over the years we have worked very hard to keep Seattle’s electricity affordable, reliable, and environmentally sound. Today, City Light is a recognized national leader in energy efficiency and environmental stewardship.

The Environmental Equity Program strives to make equal environmental and economic benefits and burdens to its customers and the citizens of Seattle regardless of race, economic status, national origin, and English proficiency, as outlined by the City of Seattle’s Equity and Environment Agenda here:
http://www.seattle.gov/Documents/Departments/OSE/SeattleEquityAgenda.pdf

The program works to educate City Light employees on strategies to meet this goal, strives to identify and change internal policies that are hurdles, and works with community partners to identify areas of opportunities to further environmental equity in everything we do. The Environmental Equity Intern will have the opportunity to support these goals and make an impact on a new program that is still in development.

Job Responsibilities:
During this internship, the intern will be specifically responsible for:

  • Developing program marketing materials with guidance from program staff and the communications team;
  • Creating and delivering PowerPoint presentations to key internal City of Seattle and community stakeholders;
  • Assisting in development of training materials;
  • Assisting in the facilitation of Environmental Equity and Race and Social Justice training for City Light staff and key internal and community stakeholders;
  • Assisting in the development of community outreach strategies;
  • Attending community events.
This internship will benefit the student through the following learning outcomes:
  • Implementation of the Equity and Environment agenda;
  • Exposure to and creating community engagement and inclusion strategies;
  • Building skills in addressing equity and inclusion in municipal government.

For more information, see the full job posting.

Lecture Series: Genomics Salon

Happy new year! We’re excited to bring you another set of Genomics Salon discussions for winter quarter. The first one will be this Thursday, January 5, at 4:30pm in Foege S-110, on the topic “Whose genomes matter? Genomics-research diversity in context.” Take a look at our upcoming schedule of events below, check out our website and twitter, and like our Facebook page. As always, snacks and drinks will be provided, and all faculty, students, and staff are welcome. See you there!
 
Thursday January 5, 2017, 4:30pm (Foege S-110)
Salon XI: Whose genomes matter? Genomics-research diversity in context
Alice Popejoy (Public Health Genetics) and Joanne Woiak (Disability Studies)
Even as genomics technologies become more powerful, their focus remains heavily on individuals of European descent – a disparity with deep historical and cultural roots.  This session will discuss scientific and philosophical issues that relate to the under-representation of minority populations in genomics research, with a particular focus on recruitment and population genetics in the context of historical and modern-day eugenics. What concepts of genetics, race, and identity contributed to the development of past eugenic ideologies? How do the shadow of eugenics and the historic underrepresentation of certain populations continue to affect the practice of genetics and biomedicine today?
 
Thursday January 19, 2017, 4:30pm (Foege N-130)
Salon XII: The next four years: science and environmental policy under the Trump administration
 
*Note that this session will be held in Foege N-130.* The inauguration of Donald Trump promises changes in US science and environmental policy. This special session of the Genomics Salon invites speakers to address how science and environmental policy priorities are set at the local and national level, and to ask how scientists can participate in policy-making and advocacy. Scott Spencer, a graduate student at the Evans School, studies science policy; Sarah Myhre, a postdoc in oceanology, writes about the role of climate scientists in reaching out to the public; Susanna Priest, editor of Science Communication, has recently finished a book on communicating climate change.
 
Thursday February 2, 2017, 4:30pm (Foege S-110)
Salon XIII: Science and responsibility
Hannah Gelman (Genome Sciences) and Doug Fowler (Genome Sciences)
The pace of scientific and technological progress can be bewildering. Recent developments in diverse fields such as genetic engineering, artificial intelligence, and renewable energy highlight the possibility of conflict between scientific research and public opinion. In this session, we will discuss the role of scientists in advancing and/or regulating scientific research and innovation, especially when this research may “run ahead” of public understanding or comfort. What factors should influence the development of a field, and who should be involved in evaluating them? Furthermore, in a rapidly evolving field, is it possible to effectively evaluate, let alone regulate, future applications?
 
Thursday February 16, 2017, 4:30pm (Foege S-110)
Salon XIV: CSI Genomics
Sarah Hilton (Genome Sciences) and Murial Moore (The Innocence Project Northwest Clinic at UW Law)
Genomic technologies have become powerful tools in criminal court, with DNA sequencing routinely used to identify or exonerate suspects, but the role of scientific evidence in court is not always straightforward. This session will explore how science and law intersect in the form of forensic genetic technologies. What is the role of scientists as expert witnesses, and how is scientific uncertainty interpreted in a legal context? How does the nature of evidence change when genetic methods move from a research to legal context?
 
Wednesday March 1, 2017, 4:30pm (Foege S-110)
Salon XV: Genomics, representation, and equity
Aaron Wolf (Genome Sciences) and James Pfeiffer (Global Health)
 
*Note that this session will be held on a Wednesday.* Recent large-scale initiatives in genome sequencing have aimed to expand genomic analysis to diverse global populations. With more data, the thinking goes, the genomic medicine can cover and benefit historically underrepresented groups. This session will examine issues of representation and equity in genomic medicine. Who benefits from the “mining” of genomic data? Does this turn in genomic medicine mark a new age in global health, or a new wave of colonialism?