Events: Genomics Salons

I hope you can join us for this summer’s Genomics Salons! The next salon will be on Thursday, July 27th at 4:30 pm in Foege S-110, on the topic “Science Education.” As always, snacks and drinks are provided, and all faculty, students, and staff are welcome. Hope to see you there!

Also, check out our websitetwitter, and Facebook page.

Thursday July 27th, 2017, 4:30pm (Foege S-110)
Salon XXII: Science Education
Cecilia Noecker (Genome Sciences) and Bryce Taylor (Genome Sciences)

Education is essential for the progress of science, yet considerations as to how we educate future scientists often go overlooked. In this salon, we’ll examine choices in science education policy, pedagogy, and curriculum. How do these decisions impact how science is carried out, who becomes a scientist, and the broader relationships between science and society?

Thursday August 31, 2017, 4:30pm (Foege S-110)
Salon XXIII: Science and Art
Sam Entwisle (Genome Sciences) and Katherine Xue (Genome Sciences)

Science and art may seem like distinct pursuits, but they have always informed and inspired one another. Art can show us the beating heart of science–and pose difficult questions about science and society. In this salon, we will explore the various ways in which art and science interact and discuss different works of art. How does training in the arts enrich a career in science? What are some of the benefits of a strong relationship between science and art? When does it make sense to separate the two practices? We will be joined by guests with direct experience at the interface of science and art.

Thursday September 14th, 2017, 4:30pm (Simpson Center – CMU 202/204)

Salon XXIV: Metaphors in Science
Leah Ceccarelli (Communications) and Sarah Nelson (Public Health Genetics)
Metaphors shape the way we speak, think, and act. While some metaphors of the genome are well-known — e.g., blueprint, map, book of life — metaphorical language works in subtler ways to shape the communication and consumption of genomics and other sciences. Join us for a discussion of metaphors in scientific and public communication about genes, whole-genome sequencing, CRISPR, and the practice of science itself.

Job Opportunity: Education Specialist – National Aquarium

National Aquarium LogoThe National Aquarium is seeking an Education Specialist to develop and teach a variety of formal education programs to school groups, teachers, and homeschoolers inside the Aquarium classrooms, galleries, and Auditorium.

Essential Functions:

  • Conducts onsite and offsite school programming.
  • Coordinates Homeschool programs including developing the schedule, organizing staffing, and instructing the programming.
  • Handles and cares for animals.
  • Assists with writing and editing school program brochures.
  • Assists with writing and updating Field Trip Planning Packets for Teachers.
  • Maintains props, order new props when needed, make repairs, and create new props/costumes.
  • Maintains and update information files relating to School Programs surveys, activities and programs.
  • Assists in other education program activities such as Outreach programs, community programs (cultural events, fairs/festivals), and youth programs (Henry Hall, Aquarium on Wheels).
  • Researches and identifies needs and develops new school and teacher programs. Prepares and updates teacher resources related to Aquarium programs and exhibits.
  • Assists with training staff and volunteers to conduct school and visitor programs.
  • Assists School Programs & Visitor Programs Coordinators with budgets, reports, and other duties as assigned.
  • Participates in professional development activities.

Qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s degree in science, education, or related field. Marine science background preferred.
  • Two years experience working with children, preferably in a non-formal education setting.
  • Current Maryland driver’s license and a clean driving record.
  • Ability to safely operate an 8-15 passenger van.
  • Working knowledge of audiovisual equipment and Microsoft office programs.

The National Aquarium is committed to diversity and invites individuals who bring a diversity of culture, experience and ideas to apply.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL AQUARIUM
Recently named one of Baltimore’s Best Places to Work, the National Aquarium opened in 1981 as a nonprofit aquatic education and conservation organization, the jewel of the city’s Inner Harbor redevelopment. SmartCEO Magazine honored the National Aquarium with the Healthiest Workplace award and the Corporate Culture award in 2016. With a mission to inspire conservation of the world’s aquatic treasures, the Aquarium is consistently ranked one of the nation’s two top aquariums and has hosted over 51 million guests since opening.

Today, the National Aquarium builds on a 35-year history of local, regional and global conservation initiatives that provide real solutions for protecting marine life, ecosystems and aquatic communities. Its Animal Rescue team has rescued, rehabilitated and released hundreds of marine mammals and endangered sea turtles throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. Its Animal Welfare and Science teams participate in important research efforts to confront pressing ocean conservation issues and advocate for smarter policies at local, state and federal levels. Through education, research, conservation action and advocacy, the National Aquarium is pursuing a vision to change the way humanity cares for our ocean planet.

HOW TO APPLY Interested and engaged applicants should apply through our website http://aqua.org/jobs. Requests for reasonable accommodation can be made by e-mailing HR@aqua.org.

Volunteer Opportunity: 2017-2018 Homework Help Volunteer Opportunities – Seattle Public Library

Seattle Public Library LogoThe Seattle Public Library is seeking Homework Help volunteers who have a passion for helping elementary, middle and high school students learn and succeed in school.

Homework Help volunteers support students’ academic success by helping them develop literacy and mathematics skills, understand homework assignments, and prepare for college and careers. Volunteers mentor students in all academic subjects and may also specialize in college-prep subjects (e.g. English and STEM fields).

Most of the students are first-generation Americans who speak a language other than English at home. Volunteers will interact with students of all ages in small groups and individually. A volunteer commitment throughout the school year is requested. Those volunteers who have variable job and/or school schedules can be scheduled as substitute Homework Helpers at least twice a month.

Homework tutoring, reading support and math educational games will be offered at the following Library locations from Sept. 11, 2017 through June 14, 2018. Bilingual volunteers who speak Spanish are especially needed at the Beacon Hill and South Park branches.

  • Beacon Hill Branch, 2821 Beacon Ave. S.
  • Broadview Branch, 12755 Greenwood Ave. N.
  • Columbia Branch, 4721 Rainier Ave. S.
  • Greenwood Branch, 8016 Greenwood Ave. N.
  • Douglass-Truth Branch, 2300 E. Yesler Way
  • High Point Branch, 3411 S.W. Raymond St.
  • Lake City Branch, 12501 28th Ave. N.E.
  • NewHolly Branch, 7058 32nd Ave. S.
  • Northgate Branch, 10548 Fifth Ave. N.E.
  • Rainier Beach Branch, 9125 Rainier Ave. S.
  • South Park Branch, 8604 Eighth Ave. S.

Visit www.spl.org/homeworkvolunteer for more information. Volunteer applications are requested by July 31, 2017.

Please contact Anne Vedella (Anne.Vedella@spl.org), Volunteer Services Coordinator, if you have questions or would like to request an application packet.

SUM 2017 Course: Science, Technology, and Public Policy (PUBPOL 583)

The Evans School has opened the following summer course to juniors and seniors (in addition to graduate students):

PUBPOL 583: Science, Technology, and Public Policy (4 credits)
Instructor: Howard McCurdy
Meets: each Wednesday for the full summer term, 5:50-8:30 pm (June 21-August 16)
Description: From the spaceship to the computer chip, public officials work hard to promote innovation through science and technology. In turn, advances in science and technology invite governmental response. This course examines important public policy issues associated with science and technology, including the debate over how much government support is necessary to spur research and innovation, the role of government as a regulator of technology, the manner in which technology alters the way in which scientific initiatives are organized, the clash between scientific findings and political ideology, and the governance challenges arising from 21stcentury technologies. Students also examine impending technologies, the relationship between culture and technology, and specific policy issues of interest to students in the class. The instructor is a graduate of the University of Washington and Cornell University, a professor in the School of Public Affairs at American University in Washington, D.C., and a frequent visitor to the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance. He has authored seven books on the U.S. space program.

Job Opportunity: Summer Study Section Instructor – University of Washington Math Science Upward Bound (MSUB) Program

University of Washington Math Science Upward Bound LogoSummer Teaching Opportunity

The University of Washington Math Science Upward Bound (MSUB) Program seeks an Instructor to teach a Study Section class to high school students in support of our Summer STEM Seminar Lecture series. MSUB is an outreach program in the Office of Minority Affairs and Diversity that helps low-income and potential first-generation college students excel in high school, get accepted to college, and graduate with a STEM degree. The goal of the summer program, held on the UW campus, is to help prepare students for the demands of college and advance their academic and personal development.

The MSUB STEM Seminar Series is designed to offer students an introduction to different STEM fields, a glimpse into original research, and insight into STEM careers. Study Section Instructors attend the Seminar Series lectures and teach a one hour STEM Survival Skills Section to support the lectures and help students acquire the skills they will need to succeed in STEM. Study Section Instructors help students understand the content of the lectures and develop good study skills, learn core lab and data analysis skills, work on group projects, and accompany students on lab and facilities tours.

The ideal candidate is an advanced graduate student or postdoc in a STEM field with teaching experience and a commitment to outreach and diversity. A B.S. or B.A. in a STEM field is required. All candidates will be required to undergo a criminal background check. Candidates from underrepresented groups or from low-income/first generation backgrounds or with experience in working with these populations are encouraged to apply. The University of Washington is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer.

The six week summer program runs from July 3 to Aug 11, with classes held 4 days per week. Teaching commitment is 2 hours per day plus prep time. Compensation is $1,400 to $1,600 depending on background and experience. For more information or to apply, please send a cover letter and resume or CV to David Wolczyk, at dwolczyk@u.washington.edu.

Job Opportunity: Part-Time K-12 STEM Education Program Manager – UW Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering

UW Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering Logo
Pre-college Education Manager
UW Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering
50% professional staff position with full benefits
Help us find an enthusiastic STEM educator to manager pre-college programs at an engineering research center on campus. The person in this role works with K-12 youth and science teachers. This position manages two summer research experience programs (the Young Scholars Program for high school students and the Research Experience for Teachers program for secondary science teachers), a new summer program for high school students (YSP-REACH), school year field trips, and more.
The CSNE is a wonderful place to work. Our community is made up of professional staff, faculty, and students. I’ve been here since 2013 and previously held this position. I promise you’ll get excellent training! The CSNE is family friendly, professional, and collaborative. Our office is located in a lovely, modern building. And…neural engineering is an exciting, multidisciplinary field.

Learn more about the CSNE and our K-12 education programs here.

The job description can be found at UW Hires, CSNE Precollege Education Manager at the UW
UW Hires requisition number: 145342
If you have questions about the position, please feel free to contact:

 

Kristen Bergsman
Engineering Education Research Manager | Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering
Graduate Research Assistant | Institute for Science & Math Education
 
Doctoral Student | Learning Sciences & Human Development
University of Washington College of Education

Save the Date: Integrated Sciences Graduation/End of Year Party, 5PM, 06/08

Please mark your calendars for the Integrated Sciences Graduation/End of Year Party, which will be held from 5:00-6:30PM on Thurs., 06/08 in the Quaternary Resource Center Library, Johnson Hall, room 377A.  This event is open to current and former Integrated Sciences students (and their guests), faculty, staff, and friends of the Integrated Sciences Program.

Cake and light refreshments will be served.

We look forward to seeing all of you.